735 stories
·
8 followers

London Underground releases a new tube map

1 Share

A new tube map has started appearing in London Underground stations, and there’s a lot of changes to this edition.

Most notable is what’s not on the map — a long purple line that should have marked the launch of the Elizabeth line.

But what’s been added is a clearer way of showing when tube stations on different lines are within walking distance of each other. Although a lot of Zone 1 is omitted as you’ll have dotted lines all over the place turning the map into a spiders web.

Also, the stations shown have to meet a set of criteria that includes stations less than a 700m or a 10minute walk apart, where there is an easy, well-lit, signposted walking route and where making the change opens up additional travel options.

Showing walking distances for connections only between different lines does means one of the more famous “it’s easier to walk” options, between Holborn or Leicester Square to Covent Garden is not shown, as it would double up the Piccadilly line and be even more confusing.

Julie Dixon, Head of Information & Design at TfL, said: “Customers may not always be aware of how close some stations are and we hope this new design will give customers better information to plan their journeys and use London’s transport network more easily.”

London TravelWatch says that it has been pressing TfL and rail operators for a number of years to show on their maps where passengers can make easy and useful interchanges between stations, most notably in its 2015 Interchange Matters report. The interchanges will also be appearing on the rail network maps as well – showing options such as a 6 minute walk between Putney and East Putney stations enabling journeys between Wimbledon and Richmond.

Janet Cooke, Chief Executive of London TravelWatch commented: “This is a great outcome of our work on interchanges. It will open up a whole new set of easier journeys and save passengers time and money at the same time by avoiding the need to go into central London.”

The addition of the dotted walking lines also cleans up one aspect of the map, where stations have been shown as connected, when in fact they’re a short walk from each other – such as West Croydon or Clapham High Street.

The biggest change though is around West Hampstead where the connected stations have been more accurately represented with the walks between them, but also the lines have had a kink added to make the separation clearer.

One missed opportunity is that at Canary Wharf they continue to show the DLR and Jubilee line stations of the same name as being close to each other, whereas anyone who knows the area knows to use Heron Quays DLR instead as it’s a much shorter walk.

The external interchanges shown on the current tube map are:

  • Archway – Upper Holloway
  • Bow Church – Bow Road
  • Canary Wharf LU – Canary Wharf DLR
  • Clapham High Street – Clapham North
  • Emirates Royal Docks – Royal Victoria
  • Forest Gate – Wanstead Park
  • Hammersmith (Circle & Hammersmith) – Hammersmith (District & Piccadilly)
  • North Greenwich – Emirates Greenwich Peninsular
  • Shadwell (London Overground) – Shadwell DLR
  • Shepherd’s Bush (Tube) – Shepherd’s Bush (London Overground)
  • Tower Gateway – Tower Hill
  • Walthamstow Central – Walthamstow Queen’s Road
  • West Croydon (London Overground) – West Croydon Tram
  • West Hampstead (Tube) – West Hampstead (London Overground)
  • White City – Wood Lane

The use of a paler grey for the zones also seems to make the map look a cleaner, and a few subtle changes have been made to the design, namely the layout of the tram lines, a curve at New Cross, and a small gap added between the Overground and Underground lines along the routes to Richmond and Watford Junction.

In addition, boat pictograms have been added at Canary Wharf, Westferry and Woolwich Arsenal to better reflect the interchange capabilities that exist with river services.

A final note — the tube map also now says in the bottom corner: “This diagram is an evolution of the original design conceived in 1931 by Harry Beck”

And that’s a reminder, that technically, it’s not a tube map, it’s a diagram, even if everyone* calls it a map.

*pedants excepted

Read the whole story
Flameeyes
1 day ago
reply
Dublin, Ireland
Share this story
Delete

Yet another blog for JBKempf: The VLC Technical Committee

1 Share

VLC Technical Committee

I'm very proud to present to you the VLC Technical Committee, as elected during the last VDD conference: Denis Charmet, Rémi Denis-Courmont, Hugo Beauzée-Luyssen, Thomas Guillem and David Fuhrmann.

The role of the VLC Technical Committee (TC), is mostly a technical resolution committee, that will arise and decide when there are disagreements and bike-shedding in our community.

Members

The glorious members of this Technical Committee are:

  • Denis Charmet, the wisest of the VLC developers, and the most-tampered, claims to have never been in conflict with anyone in the community. Let's hope that does not change. (And he has the Mon€¥, so we have to like him...)
  • Rémi Denis-Courmont, the biggest contributor to VLC ever (and still the most active non-sponsored developer around VLC); without him, VLC would not exist anymore; the one that knows more about UB, threads and network that 99.999% of the developers.
  • Hugo Beauzée-Luyssen, active on the VideoLAN community since the late 2000s, C++1x lover (yet I saw him write Go, once!), very active on the Medialibrary, compilers, toolchain, CI/CD, code-coverage, fuzzing and other toolings; he also knows about UB, even in C++ :) (some say he is secretly in love with Windows, but he will deny this). Also member of the board, since quite some time now.
  • Thomas Guillem, one of the most (the most?) active on VLC development; knows wayyyyy too much about audio and video outputs, and codecs in VLC, a lot about Android (and too much about Tizen) and other weird OSes (he even has a mac on his desk). Probably the most knowledgeable about VLC, after Rémi. He loves C and will never switch to other punk langages!
  • David Fuhrmann, the youngest of the TC, is the macOS/iOS touch of this TC, and knows this weird language called Objective-C. Some people claims he even understands Xcode and the macOS toolchain! But in his every day life, he knows C++ (don't tell Hugo)!

As you can see, in all fairness:

there are 2 people of the board in the TC, 2 out of 5 are VideoLabs employees, no roots are part of the TC, nor am I. They know about C, C++, obj-C, and Linux, Windows, macOS.

Details

The fine prints of this Technical Committee:

  • The TC can be contacted to take action, or decide by itself to take an action, on any technical subject that did not reach consensus. If no issue there is, there is no need to call the TC.
  • Votes and discussion of the TC are private.
  • You can contact the TC at vlc-tc@videolaɴ.org
  • The VLC TC cannot take action on community issues or CoC.
  • The VLC TC can be fired by the GA or any other VideoLAN meeting with the majority of votes.

May they do good work! Good luck to them!

Read the whole story
Flameeyes
46 days ago
reply
Dublin, Ireland
Share this story
Delete

I’d prefer paying a monthly subscription for updates to Cities: Skylines

1 Share
City Skylines: Industries is the seventh large expansion pack to the 2015 city builder game. This latest pack now makes Cities Skylines the the single most expensive game I’ve ever owned. Including all the expansion packs, the game has cost me just shy of 174 Euros for the complete game. City Skylines by Finish studio […]

Read the whole story
Flameeyes
46 days ago
reply
Dublin, Ireland
Share this story
Delete

Contour Diabetes app, Bluetooth, and why diabetics can’t have nice things

1 Share
I thought my new Contour Next One glucose meter with a companion phone app would work like a modern connected fitness tracker and give me convenient access to my blood sugar levels. It ended up just being more busy work. My old glucose meter model was discontinued earlier this year and I needed to find […]

Read the whole story
Flameeyes
61 days ago
reply
Dublin, Ireland
Share this story
Delete

Microsoft joins Open Invention Network

1 Share
Microsoft has announced that it has joined the Open Invention Network (OIN). "We know Microsoft’s decision to join OIN may be viewed as surprising to some, as it is no secret that there has been friction in the past between Microsoft and the open source community over the issue of patents. For others who have followed our evolution as a company, we hope this will be viewed as the next logical step for a company that is listening to its customers and is firmly committed to Linux and other open source programs."
Read the whole story
Flameeyes
62 days ago
reply
Dublin, Ireland
Share this story
Delete

Do I Have a Hardware Implant?

1 Share

Do I Have a Hardware Implant?



I’ve gotten lots of inquiries from people who want to know if I could analyze some hardware for them or could recommend someone who might. I’ll be blunt - most of you don’t need this. Here are some things you should consider before seeking out services like this:

Tags:

via Pocket <a href="https://securinghardware.com/articles/do-i-have-a-hardware-implant/" rel="nofollow">https://securinghardware.com/articles/do-i-have-a-hardware-implant/</a>

October 09, 2018 at 10:03PM

Read the whole story
Flameeyes
63 days ago
reply
Dublin, Ireland
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories